Ask a Lawyer: High School Transfer

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Get Expert Family Law Article Advice from our Ask a Lawyer Topic Section on SingleDad. Craig A. Candelore is the founding attorney at the Men’s Legal Center, and he has been providing legal help to clients who have needed assistance in the area of family law for close to 30 years.

Ask a Lawyer on SingleDad: High School Transfer

Get Expert Family Law Article Advice from our Ask a Lawyer Topic Section on SingleDad. Craig A. Candelore is the founding attorney at the Men’s Legal Center, and he has been providing legal help to clients who have needed assistance in the area of family law for close to 30 years.

Question or Comment:

My name is Alex and I am a 48-year old Divorced Dad with 2
kids: 11- year old son and 15-year old daughter. I have joint custody living
here in Los Angeles California. I have been divorced for over 7 years and have
an "average" relationship with my ex-spouse. This past spring, my ex bought a
house with her boyfriend and they moved in together. I have joint custody,
(50/50) and no longer pay spousal support due to the purchase of the home.

The reason I bring this up is because the new house is
located 5 miles away in the next neighborhood and my daughter now wants to
transfer to the high school where her mother now lives. I don’t agree with this
move because before this home purchase, I have documented emails between all
parties where the Co-Parenting plan has always been to keep our children in the
same school district that they have always been near me.

What are my legal options to block this move?

Answer:

Here are my initial thoughts based on the facts provided.

1.
Father has joint legal custody with Mom

2. Father has to be consulted on all major legal issues to include
which school children attend.

3. Theoretically you could go in and block the school move.

4. You would show the judge the e-mail traffic showing an
understanding with your Ex & daughter as to the Co-Parenting plan and you
want to stick to the plan.

5. You would explain to the judge how the change in anticipated HS
would disrupt your custodial time etc….

6.
However the court give great weight to what 14 year olds and up
have to say.

7. 14 years old and up are allowed to testify in court.

8. Best would be for Father to find out why the daughter wants to
transfer to the "new" high school?

9. Find out what is wrong with the high school she was going to
attend in your school district?

10. Can the "deficiency" of the HS in your district be compensated
for?

Craig
A. Candelore, CLS-F

Col U.S. Army (Ret.)

940 "C" Street

San Diego, CA 92101

Telephone: (619) 234.3838

Facsimile: (619) 234.7430

Website: www.menslegal.com

Richard JaramilloRichard “RJ” Jaramillo, is the Founder of SingleDad.com,
a website and social media resource dedicated to single parenting and specifically for the newly divorced, re-married, widowed and single Father with children.
RJ is self employed, entrepreneur living in San Diego and a father of three children. The mission of SingleDad is to help the community of Single Parents
“Make Life Happen…Again!”

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Richard “RJ” Jaramillo, is the Founder of SingleDad.com, a website and social media resource dedicated to single parenting and specifically for the newly divorced, re-married, widowed and single Father with children. RJ is self employed, entrepreneur living in San Diego and a father of three children. The mission of SingleDad is to help the community of Single Parents “Make Life Happen…Again!”