Ask a Lawyer: Fair and Reasonable Expenses

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Fathers Rights advice from SingleDad. Jeffery Leving is the nations leading Father’s Rights Lawyer and offers FREE advice for the divorced dad on SingleDad.com. Learn about fair and reasonable Child Support expenses. Child Custody explained… read more.

Ask a Lawyer: Fair and Reasonable Expenses for Child Support

Fathers Rights advice from SingleDad. Jeffery Leving is the nations leading Father’s Rights Lawyer and offers FREE advice for the divorced dad on SingleDad.com. Learn about fair and reasonable Child Support expenses. Child Custody explained… read more.

Question:

I am currently in the process of trying to figure out
custody/establish my legal rights for my 7-month year old daughter. The mother
and I were never married, however she is currently living with her parents, and
has chosen a daycare center that is well beyond her financial means. Taking all
of that into consideration, she is claiming she is paying rent, and paying for
everything herself, and is asking me for $1100/month in Child Support. This
amount would bankrupt me in mere months. My question is can the courts (NC)
bankrupt me in Child Support if it’s obvious that I can’t pay that (I do have a
stable job, and she has a somewhat stable job), and it’s obvious that she can’t
afford all of those factors herself?

happy dad

Answer:

You need to act immediately! Your child’s mother is going to try to
bleed you dry, if you are not careful.
Hiring an experienced family law attorney will help protect you from your
child’s mother’s attempt to bankrupt you.

While it varies from state to state, certain
guidelines have been passed into law that set out the amount of child support
that is required to be paid by a non-custodial parent. For example, in
Illinois, that amount generally is a percentage of the non-custodial parent’s
net income and is determined by the number of children involved. A custodial parent cannot simply tell
the non-custodial parent what he or she feels would be an "appropriate" amount
of support to be paid. Such power
by one parent, over another, could absolutely lead to the circumvention of the
courts and bankruptcy of the non-custodial parent.

I cannot stress the importance of having a
highly skilled attorney with extensive family court experience represent you in
this matter. I strongly advise you
to consult with one quickly to protect your relationship with your child and
your rights.

Richard JaramilloRichard “RJ” Jaramillo, is the Founder of SingleDad.com,
a website and social media resource dedicated to single parenting and specifically for the newly divorced, re-married, widowed and single Father with children.
RJ is self employed, entrepreneur living in San Diego and a father of three children. The mission of SingleDad is to help the community of Single Parents
“Make Life Happen…Again!”

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Richard “RJ” Jaramillo, is the Founder of SingleDad.com, a website and social media resource dedicated to single parenting and specifically for the newly divorced, re-married, widowed and single Father with children. RJ is self employed, entrepreneur living in San Diego and a father of three children. The mission of SingleDad is to help the community of Single Parents “Make Life Happen…Again!”